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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
out, aljazeera.com. is this the new business or usual or is it damaging american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can adai
capability is enormously important to the united states to the foreign policy to defense matters and economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: jim sciutto, cnn, washington. >>> our thanks to jim. >>> healthcare.gov is apparently off life support this morning. the obama care website back online after suffering a nationwide network outage over the weekend. later this morning, testifying at the congressional hearing will be an administration for the medicare and medicaid services. 325,000 people have now been able to sign up for private insurance through obama care state-run marketplaces. cnn has learned health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius missed an extended deadline set by house committee to turn over documents about the healthcare.gov website and could trigger a congressional subpoena from republicans. >>> lindsey graham is trying to hold up all nominations for federal positions until the outpost in benghazi appear in congress. they say they sent someone there on the night of the attack. the white house is accusing republicans of playing politics with th
to foreign policy, as much as possible you should put partisan politics aside and get the job done. that's what i've always tried to do. i give credit to governor christie for doing it. that's how the country will go forward, not by shutting down the government and not by making everything an overly partisan issue. >> republican congressman of new york, peter king. thanks for coming on today and making time for me. >> thank you. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪avo: sales event is "sback.hen drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. for details, visit vwdealer.com today. afghanistan in 2009. on the u.s.s. saratoga in 1982. [ male announcer ] once it's earned, usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation because it offers a superior level of protection and because usaa's commi
point out, nsa situation obviously a huge domestic and foreign policy issue, health care is his signature achievement to this point in his presidency. you would think he would be more in the loop is a way of saying it than he has been. >> how much of this shock that's being expressed by the allies just simply to try to get some leverage with the u.s. because everyone knew this was going on and they do it to us and we do it to them. the world of spying. >> you have to express anger this is going on. if you suspected or knew it was going on. they can use it effectively for leverage. the question now is whether or not united states is going to enter into new nonspying agreements with countries they have long resisted entering these agreements with. so whether it's the french or germans, you know, they now have a good deal of leverage to try to negotiate these pacts if they so choose. it's quite possible one result is there will be more nonspying agreements with european allies than there were before. >> i would bet on germany and not on france, just saying. mark mazzetti and chris
with a as reaction to bush who was so dumb. this guy is a genius. is he a policy guy. he is not a policy guy. he is a talker. >> that is it for the panel. stay tuned to see how the president played the odds in foreign policy. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in. with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our business. od. helping the world keep promises. >>> finally tonight, president obama is under fire from world leaders for tapping their cell phones and listening in. one show points out he is really just staying true to his own word. >> true partnership and true progress require constant work and sustained sacrifice. they require allies who will listen to each other, learn from each other, and most of all trust each other. [cheers and applause] >> listen, learn, trust, you know, two out of three ain't bad. >> thanks for inviting us into your home tonight. that is it for this "special report," fair, balanced and unafraid. don't forget tomorrow is a big day on capitol hill.
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct of foreign policy, to the fed's matters, to economic matters and i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. we'll try to ask some of our own. >> absolutely. review on multiple fronts but what will come of it? jim sciutto, great to see you. thank you so much. >>> the obama administration is facing ongoing criticism on another front. obama care. the president'sed visors are fighting back on twitter, challenging claims millions of people could lose coverage because of the law. the administration is extending the signup window by six weeks. senior white house correspondent brianna keilar is here with the very latest. >> that signup deadline now march 31st. it had been februa
, there are real risks of disclosure. so it's kind of the classic foreign policy dilemma that you have very modest tactical benefits and a huge strategic risk. that has now blown up in our faces. >> bill? >> i would say if you're going to eavesdrop on phone calls of the german chancellor, that has to be something that the president of the united states authorizes and thinks frankly is worth the risk of exposure, as nick says. you can't just have the bureaucracy doing that. i would like to know, did this president or the previous president, for that matter, sanction that and if so, maybe they thought it was worth it. i don't have a principled problem with listening to other people's calls, even some allies, if we think it's important. you shouldn't do it in a haphazard way which generally damages relations with the real ally. >> do you think it's true that the president of the united states would not know that the nsa is listening in to angela merkel's phone conversations? >> you know, i'm a little mystified by that. i talked today to a former senior cia official and asked about that, and this pers
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
, that intelligence capability is enormously important to the united states, to our conduct, our foreign policy, to defense matters, to economic matters, and i am a strong supporter of it. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper announced overnight he is declassifying a trove of documents about the collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance acts, or first ssa. later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexen direction will be testify on the hill about that program. you can be sure they're going to be getting questions about spying overseas, how far it should go and what limits the administration is considering placing on it now. >> this is a huge story, especially in europe. jim sciutto, thank you very much. >>> republican senator lindsey graham turning up the heat on the obama administration for its handling of last year's benghazi rror attack and its aftermath. the outspoken critic of the administration is threatening to block all presidential nomination, before the senate until survivors of that attack testify before congress. take a listen to graham on f
in just one month. how this could affect u.s. foreign policy on fighting terrorism and is other key issues, we expect to hear more on the white house news conference scheduled to begin in 90 minutes kyla campbell ktvu channel 2 news. >>> and diane feinstein plans to give continued authority. she heads the senate select committee on intelligence. they are drafting legislation to put restrictions on the nsa phone records program. the legislation would allow the nsa to continue gathering records listing the numbers, time and duration of all u.s. telephone calls but not their content the. >>> time is 8:15. well, this week marks the first anniversary of superstorm sandy. one of the nation's worst natural disaster. this morning historic ellis island will reopen for the first time since that big storm slammed into new york harbor. superstorm sandy ravaged the island, left it without power for several months. the clean up work is far from over despite the reopening today. ellis island is best known as you know for ushering millions of immigrants into the united states over the years. now, a lot oa
of foreign leaders, but it is awkward and may even force a change in policy. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last two years is the capacity continues to develop and expand which is why i'm initiating a review now to make sure that was a are able to do does not necessarily mean it is what they should be doing. >> washington's defense of the surveillance program is that everyone spies on everyone and a ay -- anyway but this is question of scale. nobody does a as big as america. >> i spoke with democratic congressman brad sherman who sits on the foreign affairs committee. mr. sherman, thank you for joining me. did you hear anything in the hearings today that justified to you what the surveillance programs might have been doing think you have a series of interconnected and somewhat reckless decisions. of first was to give many the 500,000 people a security clearance access to far more information than they would have had before we began chanting that we need to connect the dots so that everyone needs to have access to everything. engage in expect to the secret activi
on. the reason why it's important is because it is a policy issue that has very broad implications. it could put the united states in a difficult position. >> woodruff: yesterday dianne feinstein expressed outrage over spying on friendly foreign leaders. she says white house officials assured her it's going to end. the white house said only that a review is underway. for his part, the president declined to address reports that he did not learn of the practice until last summer. instead, he told the fusion news channel -- >> well, first of all, i'm not confirming a bunch of assumptions that have been made in the press. there are strict law about what we do internally and that was the initial concern about the snoend disclosures. internationally, there are less constraints on how our intelligence teams operate. >> woodruff: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of lawmakers called today for an end to most of the n.s.a.'s surveillance with phone records and e-mails. one of those lawmakers calling for limits to spying is wisconsin republican jim sensenbrenner chairman of the house crime and te
foreign intelligence services will try to monitor them. they do to so create knowledge about the way policy makers make decisions and so forth. so i think some of that stuff is a little bit overblown on their part but we should always review our intelligence programs and make sure they're not abused and make sure they're used in the most effective ways. jenna: always great to have you on the program. we always cover a loft ground and we appreciate it. thank you. much more on the big story coming up in a moment jon: a stunning new report from the centers for disease control now claiming that even perfectly healthy children are dying from flu complications. let's talk about it with a board certified e.r. physician and l.s.u. shreveport adjunct assistant professor. you always hear the warnings that the elderly and the very young should get the flu shots because they're the most susceptible but there are 7-year-old, 8-year-old children who die and were otherwise healthy. >> it was a little alarming. the c.d.c. came out with a study where they looked over the last few years and i think if
name it. like many institutions of higher education, a high number of the students there are foreign national whors studying under student visas. under our current immigration policy, mr. speaker, our state, our public state institutions, we provide this world class education for people that feel a need in the economy. they're going to be great engineers, great mathematicians, great computer scientists. they graduate with a masters, a ph.d., what do we tell them? go back to another country and compete against us. compete against us. we're telling them to compete against us. how does that make sense, mr. speaker? what we need to do is provide a way, and the senate bill and h.r. 15 do this, where people with advanced degrees in these fields are able to stay here. today's companies don't care where the jobs are. you can be a computer programmer in india. you can be a computer programmer in france. you can be a computer programmer here. out of convenience we'd rather have you here but the job is going to follow you. the job is going to follow you, not the other way around. in addition, i
? >> with foreign leaders i care about our foreign leaders who are our allies, are they talking to my enemies, i want hear it. are they talking to each other about what they're going to tell us or what their policy positions are going to be. i want to hear that. is angela merkel using that fine talking to her intelligence phone deciding what they will and won't share with us? >> haven't we gotten enough information to justify the intrusion? is it the right question, and what is the answer? >> absolutely a fair question and chris, i think this whole debate has changed in a post-9/11 world where we have all this new capability. we are able to do surveillance. there are oversight mechanisms in place, but i think it's time for us to have a public debate about has our government made the balance right. we have members of congress who implement laws who enact laws and if americans don't like it, they need to engage with their congressperson and talk about how should the balance between privacy and civil liberties versus our national security be made. >> i get the sensitivities about american citizenry
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)